Mustards

Mustards

We got on the fruit and veggie mustard band wagon when an over-abundance of super ripe peaches left us tired of preserves and eager to try our hands at something a little different. Enter the humble mustard seed, and our faith that we could turn those peaches into something better than compost. We got busy and soon discovered how adaptable (and forgiving) mustards could be. These are some of the mustards at which we've tried our hand, and something tells us we'll be trying more.

Stone Fruits

We started with peaches, but quickly realized that we could mix all of the light colored stone fruits into our stone fruit mustard. Yellow and white cling peaches & nectarines, as well as apricots are all featured in our stone fruit mustards. These mustards have a stolid sort of appearance, vaguely Bavarian. They are delicious on any sandwiches, but we have a particular weakness for ham, brie and our stone fruit mustards on a French roll.
We also have a plum variety with a purple hue we find quite fetching!

Fig

As with the peaches, we found ourselves the lucky recipients of mission figs that were quickly going to be on the wrong side of ripe if we didn't do something, and FAST! We were tired of preserves and figured, "Hey! Mustard!" Thus we birthed our sweet fig mustard. Delicious alongside pork, especially sausages and chops. 

Papaya

This mustard was a pure flight of fancy, with nothing to lose. Papaya is a fruit we have found does not lend itself particularly well to preserves, but is astounding as a dried fruit when candied. However, the amount of work required to create that taste sensation can be numbing. We looked at the case of papayas we couldn't bear to let go to waste and that tiny, humble seed insinuated itself into our consciousness, yet again. "Mustard!" et voilà, this tropical mustard was created. Rumor has it this mustard added to the crock as you're making pulled pork creates some rockin' street tacos.

Indian Chutneyed

it probably goes without mentioning that we were, yet AGAIN, faced with cases of fruit for which we needed to quickly find a home. Our fruit dryers were full, we didn't have all the ingredients for Monkey Jam nor Drunken Sauce, and we were lately experimenting with Indian flavors in our cooking. Thus the many cases of spotty bananas were peeled and tossed in a pot with our tiny mustard seed friend, alongside aromatic Indian spices, our house made raisins, onion, and our tomato paste. Try it on burgers!